Ticonderoga Fort Fever Series

Join Fort Ticonderoga museum staff to learn about the latest research and programs during this lecture series. Programs are offered Sundays at 2pm. 

January 12, 2020: Fort Fever Series: Documenting, Preserving, and Making Accessible Ticonderoga’s Collections
Join Director of Collections Miranda Peters as she highlights the incredible work underway by museum staff to document, preserve, and make accessible Ticonderoga’s Museum Collections. Topics will include recent discoveries in storage, transformative rehousing projects, and the many ways that everyone can access Ticonderoga’s collections. Original objects will be on display just for this presentation—some for the first time ever! This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (Grant# MA-3018-0166-18).

February 9, 2020: Fort Fever Series: First in War, First in Peace, First in Tourism: George Washington’s 1783 visit to Ticonderoga and the end of the American Revolution
In July of 1783, George Washington became Ticonderoga’s first and most famous tourist. Washington’s visit was driven by curiosity rather than war, but his tour of Ticonderoga masks the activities occurring along the Champlain Valley that summer related to the acknowledgement of American Independence and the final declaration of peace. Join Fort Ticonderoga Curator Matthew Keagle to explore the forgotten conclusion of the Revolutionary War in the north.

March 8, 2020: Fort Fever Series: Discovering Women in Fort Ticonderoga’s Collections
Women’s History Month, join Registrar & Site Archaeologist, Margaret Staudter, for a survey of objects owned and used by both famous and unknown women in Fort Ticonderoga’s collections. Many of these objects have recently been cataloged and photographed with funding made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (Grant# MA-30-18-0166-18).

April 5, 2020: Fort Fever Series: “Fitted with Great Exactness”: The life and importance of clothing to the British soldier in the era of the American Revolution
Putting a British soldier into his red coat and other clothes wasn’t as easy as a simple issuance of clothing. Great efforts from many hands were required to ensure that the clothing was made, individually fit, maintained and then remade all for the purpose of ensuring a proper “soldier like” appearance. Join Joseph Zea Fort Ticonderoga Artificer Tailor to explore the expense, functionality, and the longevity of soldiers’ clothes. Many recommendations and practices formed patterns within regiments that involved tailors, followers, and the soldiers themselves that focused solely on ensuring the best use of a soldier’s clothing was achieved.